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| Ingredients | How to cook Oxtail

How to cook Oxtail

Don’t shy from the distinct appearance of the oxtail. When cooked slowly, the oxtail can produce a tasty meat with a robust beef flavour.

The cut

Fairly obvious, the oxtail comes from the tail part of the anatomy with a large bone to muscle ratio. When cooked, the collagen melts down rendering a tender, rich flavour ideal in stews, while long, slow braising in a liquid will achieve the most tender result with maximum flavour.

How to cook

Best cooking methods – Slow Cooking, Simmer

Sprinkle the oxtails with a little salt and coat the sides with flour. Add them to a hot skillet on medium-high heat for 5-10 minutes until evenly browned on all sides. Transfer oxtails to a slow cooker. Depending on your chosen recipe, this is when you add herbs, vegetables and flavours. Cover the oxtails with liquid by about 1 inch. Cover with a tight lid and cook on low for 8 hours or 3 to 4 hours on high heat. Be careful not to remove the lid and stir as this will allow the heat to escape. Transfer to a serving platter and let the oxtail rest for 3-5 minutes before eating.

Nutritional information

Summary:
  • Good source of Protein
  • Good source of Vitamin B12
  • Good source of Zinc
  • Source of Iron 
  • Low Sodium
Nutrient Composition:

Oxtail, Raw, Lean (per 100g)

  • Energy: 715kJ
  • Energy: 171kcal
  • Protein: 20.0g
  • Total Fat: 10.1g
  • Saturated Fat: 4.2g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.41g
  • Omega 3: 0.12g
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 4.8g
  • Cholesterol: 75mg
  • Sodium: 110mg
  • Iron: 2.7mg
  • Zinc: 5.6mg
  • Vitamin B12: 3.0ug
  • Vitamin D3: -
  • 25-OH Vitamin D3: 0.109ug
  • Selenium: 4.4ug

Consider nutrition information of other ingredients added while cooking.

Source: NZ Food Composition Tables. Beef and Lamb Cuts Additional Data. NZ Institute for Crop & Food Research, August 2002.

Posted by Shawn Moodie

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