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| Ingredients | How to cook lamb shanks

How to cook lamb shanks

Lamb shanks are a popular ingredient on winter menus due to their fabulous texture and rich flavour. Easy to prepare, they simply need slow, gentle cooking to release their full potential.

The cut

Shanks are from the bottom section of the leg just below the lower leg joint. They can be 'French trimmed' which is where a small piece of meat is removed from the bone to make the shank look more appealing. 

How to cook

Best cooking methods – Slow

Being a full flavoured cut, lamb shanks can take strong flavours such as curry based spices, fiery flavours of chilli, strong leafy herbs such as coriander and basil and of course, an old favourite, red wine jus.

Remove the lamb shanks from the refrigerator 30 minutes before cooking to bring to room temperature which results in even cooking. To get the best out of the shanks make sure to sear them first in a very hot pan until they are brown all over, which intensifies the flavour of the final dish. Slowly cook the shanks in a casserole dish with your choice of vegetables, herbs and stock in the oven or slow cooker as per recipe instructions, until they're meltingly tender.

Nutritional information

Summary:
  • Good source of Protein
  • Good source of Vitamin B12
  • Good source of Zinc
  • Source of Iron
  • Low Sodium

Based on 100g of lamb fore-shank, lean and braised.

Nutrient Composition:

Lamb Shank, Raw, Lean (per 100g)

  • Energy: 514kJ
  • Energy: 122kcal
  • Protein: 22.1g
  • Total Fat: 3.8g
  • Saturated Fat: 1.32g
  • Polyunsaturated Fat: 0.29g
  • Omega 3: 0.11g
  • Monounsaturated Fat: 1.14g
  • Cholesterol: 64.6mg
  • Sodium: 82mg
  • Iron: 1.37mg
  • Zinc: 4.28mg
  • Vitamin B12: 2.21ug
  • Vitamin D3: 0.02ug
  • Selenium: 7.0ug

Consider nutrition information of other ingredients added while cooking.

Source: New Zealand Food Composition Database 2019. New Zealand Food Composition Database Online Search. The New Zealand Institute for Plant & Food Research Limited and Ministry of Health. www.foodcomposition.co.nz/search/M1096

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