FOOD FOR SPORT

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Sarah Walker, Iron Maiden since 2008; Sophie Pascoe, Iron Maiden since 2012; Lisa Carrington, Iron Maiden since 2012; Eliza McCartney, Iron Maiden since 2016.
 
 
GENES + TRAINING + NUTRITION = OPTIMUM PERFORMANCE

Whether we play sport for fun or competitively, we need food for energy to keep us going. Nutrition, along with genetic make-up and training, is an important component in reaching your personal best.

The right type, quantity and quality of foods help you cope with the increased nutritional requirements of a rigorous training schedule. When you put so much time and effort into training, it makes sense to put the same into your nutrition plan.

EXERCISE INTENSITY

Your nutritional needs vary depending on your training volume, frequency and intensity. 

If you can hold a conversation while exercising it is probably low intensity. If breathing is an effort and you take a sharp breath to speak, it is moderate intensity exercise. If you can hardly speak and are panting quite heavily, it is high intensity exercise.
 
LOW INTENSITY MODERATE INTENSITY HIGH INTENSITY
Walking on the flat
Cycling on the flat
Gardening
Lawn bowls
Water Walking
Golf
Jogging (7km/hr)
Walking uphill
Netball 
Tennis
Weight training
Aerobics
Skiing
Running (10-15km/hr)
Competitive sports
Cycling (race pace)
Swimming (race pace)
Rowing (race pace)
Squash

After a light exercise session, you may not need a recovery meal and can get away with eating a regular meal or snack i.e. eating lunch after gardening in the late morning. With higher intensity exercise you need to make sure to eat well after your training session to replenish your energy stores and aid muscle recovery. 

Read our Food For Sport leaflet for more information on carbohydrate, fat, protein and electrolyte needs. 
 
food-for-sport2 during comp
   

NUTRITION DURING COMPETITION
  • Familiarise yourself with the food and drinks to be available on competition day or take your own.
  • In high intensity and long duration events such as tournaments, plan to eat carbohydrate-containing foods and fluids at regular intervals (every 20 minutes if practical).
PRE-COMPETITION NUTRITION
  • Choose low GI carbohydrate foods before an event, such as a small bowl of low GI cereal with milk and a fruit salad or wholegrain bread with lean meat and a banana. Always try new foods in training first.
  • A pre-competition meal is especially important for events over 90 minutes. 
  • Aim to eat 1 to 4 hours before an event.
  • If you find high fibre foods difficult to tolerate, or experience flatulence and diarrhoea, see a Sports Nutritionist or Dietitian for a low fibre/low residue diet.
  • Be well hydrated by drinking according to thirst prior to the event, e.g water, sports drinks or diluted fruit drinks.
POST-COMPETITION NUTRITION
  • Replace fluids and electrolytes (salts). 
  • Replenish depleted glycogen stores. 
  • Provide nutrients to help repair muscle damage. 
  • Eat snacks rich in carbohydrate and a small amount of protein to help recovery.


 
 

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BEEF + LAMB NEW ZEALAND

PO BOX 33 648
TAKAPUNA, AUCKLAND, NEW ZEALAND
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