ROAST

ROASTING IS ONE OF THE EASIEST COOKING METHODS; ONCE IT'S IN THE OVEN IT TAKES CARE OF ITSELF.

Roast 970x300
HOW TO ROAST

STEP ONE:

Preheat oven according to the cut and weight of beef or lamb you are roasting (use guide below).

STEP TWO:

Place the roast on a rack in a roasting dish. Brush lightly with oil and season with a little salt and pepper and any other flavourings of your choice.

STEP THREE:

Cook for calculated time basting occasionally.

STEP FOUR:

Remove from the oven when cooked to desired degree. Transfer to a plate, cover loosely with foil and rest for 10-20 minutes before carving across the grain for optimum tenderness.
TIPS FOR TOP RESULTS
  • COOK MEAT FROM ROOM TEMPERATURE:

    If possible, take the meat from refrigerator about 30 minutes before cooking. This will allow enough time for the beef or lamb to come to room temperature and result in more even cooking.
  • CARVE ACROSS THE GRAIN:

    This will result in optimum tenderness. Click here for a basic guide.
  • BROWN MEAT FIRST: 

    This will improve flavour, particularly when using small, very lean cuts that only need to cook for a short amount of time.
  • USE A MEAT RACK:

    This will allow even heat circulation and browning.
  • REST: 

    Resting is one of the most important steps as it enables the temperature to even out and the meat fibres to relax and reabsorb some of the juices.
Roasting Temperature / Time Guide – per 500g

BEEF

TEMP

RARE

MEDIUM

WELL DONE

Scotch, Sirloin, Eye Fillet, Rump 200ºC 15-20 mins 20-25 mins 25-30 mins
Standing Rib, Silverside, Topside 160ºC 20-25 mins 25-30 mins 30-35 mins

LAMB

TEMP

RARE

MEDIUM

WELL DONE

Rack, Rump, Mini Roast 220ºC 15-20 mins 20-25 mins 25-30 mins
Leg, Shoulder, Carvery Leg 180ºC 20-25 mins 25-30 mins 30-35 mins
How do I know when my roast is ready?

Either use a meat thermometer, or pierce meat with a fine skewer - clearer juices indicate the roast is more well done. NOTE: A larger piece of meat requires fewer minutes per 500g than a smaller cut. Roasts with bone-in cook more quickly than boned and rolled roasts.

USING A MEAT THERMOMETER

There are many variables when cooking a roast – the size, temperature, cut and shape for example. A meat thermometer removes some of the guesswork and is the most accurate way to know when your roast is ready.
Remove the meat from the oven and insert the thermometer into the thickest part, away from fat or bone. The internal temperatures should read as follows:

  • Rare = 45-50ºC
  • Medium rare = 55-60ºC
  • Medium = 60-65ºC
  • Well done = 70-75ºC
  • Very well done = 75-80ºC
BEST CUTS FOR ROASTING

BEEF CUTS

LAMB CUTS

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